Paper Towns by John Green

Quentin Jacobsen has spent a lifetime loving the magnificently adventurous Margo Roth Spiegelman from afar. So when she cracks open a window and climbs back into his life--dressed like a ninja and summoning him for an ingenious campaign of revenge--he follows. 


After their all-nighter ends and a new day breaks, Q arrives at school to discover that Margo, always an enigma, has now become a mystery. But Q soon learns that there are clues--and they're for him. Urged down a disconnected path, the closer he gets, the less Q sees of the girl he thought he knew.

Printz medalist John Green returns with the brilliant wit and searing emotional honesty that have inspired a new generation of readers.


Okay. You guys all know by now that I'm a huge John Green fan. Looking for Alaska is one of my all-time favorite books, and An Abundance of Katherines was so nerdy and unique that I had to love it. I was so excited to read this book. And it was still so good. I still really liked it. This book just didn't get to the level of love for me.

The writing was still mind blowing. It's what saved the book. If anyone else besides John Green and his distinctive writing style wrote this book, I probably wouldn't have liked it. He never ceases to just say the smartest things. The things that people all think deep down and just never put into words. The metaphors... just whoa. Paper Towns is all about how we see people the way we want to see them, and not as who they really are. And I think about my life and the people around me and it's just  So. True. So again, I am bowing down the the writing god that is John Green. *bows*

The thing about this book is that I liked Quentin. I really did. He had that distinct voice and smart thoughts that John Green perfects. And while I liked Quentin, I felt as though I never really got to know him, like I got to know Miles and Colin. He was always so focused on finding/obsessing over Margo that I didn't connect with him the way I connected with Green's other MC's. And maybe that was the point.

The side characters were all pretty good. I loved Radar, and his parents' black Santa collection. Ben annoyed the crap out of me, but that was the purpose of his character. I liked Lacey enough, but I more liked that for once the popular girl was likable.

Margo was...I don't even know. She was absent throughout most of the book, so I got to know her solely through what others thought of her. And that was exactly the point of Margo's character. That no one, not even the reader could really get to know her. That I myself got to form my own interpretation of who in fact Margo Roth Spiegelman was. Which, when you think about it like that, is quite brilliant. Still, when she was around, I had trouble understanding where she came from.

Plot wise, the story was all over the place, with the focus on Quentin's obsession of finding Margo. Sometimes I got a bit bored and was waiting for the story to pick up. But I loved the fact that I was constantly guessing, that I never knew quite what to expect. There was still something about it that just didn't grip me the way his other books have. I wasn't as affected.

Paper Towns is still a fabulous read told with an honest voice and full of deep, metaphorical meaning. It's almost ridiculous how much I fan girl over John Green's writing. It's truly gorgeous, while still being funny and occasionally gross. Basically as gorgeous as a book can be when told from the perspective of an eighteen-year-old boy. Read it.




1 comments:

Quinn said...

I absolutely LOVEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE this book. And Ben is my favorite character! He's hilarious!